Made it to Kuzomen

Almost free of misadventures. The only exception was the muffler that broke off while we were, already in Kuzomen, going through deep sand. No effect on the vehicle’s ability to move. Of the south coast of the Kola Peninsula attractions, I’ll share the impressions of our stop by the Chapel of the Unknown Monk, one of the key local saints whose body was pulled up in fishermen’s nets somewhere in the 16th century near what’s now the village of Kashkarantsy. The poor fellow never got identified, but fish was caught particularly well in the sea near his grave, and miracle cures happened, thus the status of “local saint” and a small chapel. In our stops there in previous years, we were delighted to see a donation box left undisturbed in this remote and unprotected place. Now it is gone, with the following instructions displayed instead:

more >>

Rye dough figurine celebration in Kuzreka

Rye dough ritual figurine celebration took place in Kuzreka yesterday, August 8. That was the 8th event of this sort, and this time it attracted a crowd of 2000, including the representatives of the regional authorities and a bunch of folk music groups.

Part of the festival was the scarecrow competition. The only part of the festivities that made me regret I wasn’t there in person.

Here are some pictures of the event borrowed from hibiny.com:

more >>

The invasion of artists to the Ter area of the Kola Peninsula

25 artists, mostly from the north-western parts of Russia, plan to work on the White Sea coast between Kandalaksha and Umba from July 25 to August 5. Sketches will be exhibited on August 4 at the Local History Museum in Kandalaksha. Works based on the collected materials, when ready, are promised to be presented to the public from September 21 to November 18, 2018, in the Regional Art Museum in Murmansk at Ul. Kominterna 13.

Ice invasion

“In the winter of 1888, on the 5th (new style: 18th) of January, at about three in the morning, the residents of Kashkarantsy were awakened by a strange and terrifying noise of ice mountains of huge size moving onto their village from the sea, destroying barns, houses, and boats..”

Saw the same thing in its miniature version yesterday:

Beginning of Spring in the White Sea

It’s just a few pictures of our walks around Kandalaksha during March.

more >>

Polar night over in Kandalaksha

Yesterday I was dragged out to Luvenga by my mate Alexandra, who totally disregarded my profound desire to spend Jan. 1 in coach-glued lethargy, and was forced to observe the first true sunrise of the year.

sunrise-1 more >>

A small mid-October camping trip

This last weekend I was made to drag my ass along the south edge of the Kola Peninsula to the so-called Nos (“nose”) Cape, just east of the Golden Gate and Tetrina fishing base and ~3 miles to the village of Kuzreka. The latter is famous as the site of the Pomor ritual cookie festival and is, incidentally, open to foreign travellers despite Russian submarines regularly surfacing in the bay.

14

A popular summer destination among the locals, in the middle of October it was populated only by us, a fishing family from Apatity, and a bear who left numerous footprints

18

and other evidence of its presence. more >>

The Aurora Borealis season is here..

aurora-1

The Cross Mountain, just east from Kandalaksha, last night

Sightings of Aurora Borealis had been reported on August 30 and today, Sept. 2. Here they are, from the VK page of Kandalaksha photographer Igor Prozorov.

more >>

Hills over the Kolvitsa village

Here are some photos from the recent trip to the tundra hills over the village of Kolvitsa, thanks to two Finnish travelers I took there. During a good half a day in the hills we met no one and saw not a single piece of trash. I think I’m starting to understand what draws people up there.

kolvitsa-hills-1
The white stuff is lichens. No reindeer here, thus lots of lichens.kolvitsa-hills-2kolvitsa-hills-3
Picking cloudberries..

kolvitsa-hills-4
On top of one of the highest hills in the area..