If you fall through ice

conveniencesI’ve been dragged onto ice a lot recently (and also to cemeteries, where drowning was often indicated as the cause of death). And hearing stories, in vivid details. And shown crosses, erected if you **didn’t** drown despite all odds, on top of many local hills and along the cost. Also, as I’m researching the travel market here it becomes even more apparent that salmon is the top thing that brings you guys here, and a lot of it is done while ice is still on. All that compelled me to post these three videos with instructions on how to proceed should you find yourself in water.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=5gOW8ZaYqHA

The main points: no struggling. It is not like every second counts. No. Minutes do, yes. But **not** seconds. You have 5-10 minutes during which you’ll be active and in possession of yourself even in the coldest water. Unless you have a cardiac arrest right when you fall in but then there no longer is much different what you do. If that happens, give up and spend your last 5-10 seconds doing whatever your core faith recommends. Assuming your heart is beating and neurons firing in orderly manner, you have a very good chance of getting out unscattered. For the first few seconds (up to a minute, sometimes more, depending on the type of clothing) the air in there will keep you afloat. So no struggling please. Look around you. Enjoy the thought that at last you are having a true adventure. All well so far. Go back. The hardest thing will be to get over the edge. Throw your coat on ice and wait till it freezes, and crawl over it, or try to freeze to ice with your elbow. Even if you can’t get out completely, keep up as much as you can to minimize heat loss and give yourself time. If passing out try to do that with your head up, eg. by freezing to ice with your elbows before you tune out. Oh, do things that require the use of fingers first because they (your fingers) will go numb quick, eg. get rid of your overcoat or backpack or, if you boat has flipped over in near-freezing water, disconnect the sail. You need to do the latter to have a chance to put it back up. Or to raw while sitting on top of a capsized boat. (Been there once, in snow, and diving under and loosening the sale and untying the mast was the best thing I did. It allowed me to drag myself and my catamaran to the shore with minimal losses). One good thing is that death from freezing is (or is said to be) painless although drowning is probably on the unpleasant side. But then again, your may pass out before drowning. I’d appreciate first hand info about how it all is seen from within. One of my few remaining friends has drowning of his/her method of choice while I would vote for a gun or even better a competently performed blood letting, Roman style. A disclaimer I’m making because the last thing I want is to fall under Article 110 or 110 of the Russian Federation Criminal Code, one of recently added prohibitive articles: I in no way approve of the act. Sorry, went off tangent again. Careful with ice, and enjoy your winter!

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